Have Questions about Associate Degree? Learn Directly from Our FAQs

It’s Monday morning and at a job that doesn’t allow you to live up to your fullest capacity, you ‘re once again hoping to avoid the week ahead. You are in a slump. It’s time for a career shift — and you begin to think the best approach to opening those new doors is formal education. You know one thing for sure-you would prefer not to spend four years at school before starting your new career. It seems a little more achievable to spend two years or less on earning an associate degree.

But is an associate’s degree really worth it?

Or are you better off continuing to try your luck without having to apply for any?

associate degree
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One big decision to take is to pursue a degree. There’s a lot of examinations to do, but where do you even start? We have discovered the following Q&As to help you in your research which will provide you with more insights about the associate degree option.

Read on to learn why an associate degree could be the perfect educational alternative for your life goals.

What’s an associate degree?

An associate degree is an undergraduate degree that is awarded following a two or three year post-secondary study course. It is a grade level between a high school diploma or GED and a bachelor’s degree.

Programs offered in an associate program may be similar to those taken in a nearly equivalent bachelor’s degree program. For instance, in addition to 100- and 200-level courses, the general education prerequisites in a bachelor’s program may comprise of similar courses required to complete an associate degree.

Why should I pursue an associate degree program?

There are a number of reasons why you may choose to pursue an associate degree, whether you plan to pursue your subsequent bachelor’s degree or simply want to take the first steps towards higher education while working full-time.

1. A degree of an associate’s program can help determine how you can work to handle education and personal commitments.

Discoveries in education technology have led to adaptive learning platforms and online classrooms. Students are thus given more options to help balance school, family, and work commitments. Because an associate degree requires less course credits than a bachelor’s, and because these are usually introductory classes, this can help to determine whether 300 and 400-level courses might fit into your schedule if you decide to pursue a bachelor’s degree program.

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2. An associate degree program can lead you to earning your bachelor’s degree in the future.

Since the curriculum of an associate program is often taken from and built around several general educational requirements necessary to earn a bachelor’s degree, an associate degree can help you prepare to accomplish a future bachelor’s degree. Two additional years of school may be needed to earn a bachelor’s degree after graduating as an associate; however, some online programs may allow you to earn a bachelor’s degree in as little as a total of three years.

3. Graduates of an associate degree program may see lower unemployment rates.

While no degree program can promise a career in the field you selected, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports associate degree holders face lower rates of unemployment compared to those with a high school diploma only. Specifically, according to 2017 data, unemployment stands at 3.4 percent for those with an associate degree, while those with a high school diploma face unemployment at 4.6 percent.

What associate’s degree should I get?

Once you’ve chosen to earn an associate degree, you’ll find many options to choose from – in terms of institutions, programs, and methods of learning.

Thousands of schools across the state are awarding associate degrees, and there are many options to choose from in the U.S.

Accreditation by the school is one serious factor. It is essential that the proper institutions or accreditation commissions select a school which is recognized and certified. Other factors to consider when choosing an associate degree program include:

  • Applicability of the degree to potential professional fields
  • Costs and fees, along with your ability to pay through financial assistance, such as work , study, scholarships, grants or loans.
  • The courses offered by the program and their significance to the professional pathways you wish to pursue
  • Faculty credential and/or reputation of teaching staff
  • Quality of the academic and professional counseling or career programs of the school
  • If you decide to continue your education, you can transfer your credit earned during an associate program into an undergraduate program.
  • Your field of interest
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How many credits is an associate degree?

Associate degrees are considered 2-year degrees, although some students move faster or slower based on what’s going on in their lives and how much time they want to spend on classroom activities.

Associate degrees generally require 60 credits of coursework, which equates to 20 college courses. That’s half the academic requisites for a bachelor’s degree.

Is associate degree capitalized?

The simple answer is no, you do not capitalize either of these two words if you use them descriptively in a sentence except if, of course, they are used at the beginning of the sentence when the basic capitalization rules apply.

That being said, if you are making reference to the specific degree you have earned or are earning, you should capitalize it. Title capitalization rules require you to capitalize on each word by quoting the specific name of the associate degree, such as the Associate of Science.

Remember the basic capitalization rules you learned in middle school? Well, they’re going to apply here.

Grammar rules require that we do not capitalize on common nouns such as school, house, hospital, etc. as they are general names.

The term associate degree is also a common noun. There is no particular degree called ‘associate degree.’ It is simply generalized form.

Nevertheless, when you give a name to the degree, it earns an identity. These are alluded to as proper nouns and should therefore be capitalized.

Where to get associate’s degree in US?

If you plan to transfer to a four-year college and earn a bachelor’s degree, you can earn an associate’s degree and complete half of your college credits first at a community college. This is a great choice if you want to save extra cash or get your grades up before you take a bachelor’s degree.

Schools offering associate’s degree – transfer degrees by state:

  1. Alabama Colleges
  2. Alaska Colleges
  3. American Samoa Colleges
  4. Arizona Colleges
  5. Arkansas Colleges
  6. California Colleges
  7. Colorado Colleges
  8. Connecticut Colleges
  9. Delaware Colleges
  10. District of Columbia Colleges
  11. Florida Colleges
  12. Georgia Colleges
  13. Hawaii Colleges
  14. Idaho Colleges
  15. Illinois Colleges
  16. Indiana Colleges
  17. Iowa Colleges
  18. Kansas Colleges
  19. Kentucky Colleges
  20. Louisiana Colleges
  21. Maine Colleges
  22. Maryland Colleges
  23. Massachusetts Colleges
  24. Michigan Colleges
  25. Minnesota Colleges
  26. Mississippi Colleges
  27. Missouri Colleges
  28. Montana Colleges
  29. Nebraska Colleges
  30. Nevada Colleges
  31. New Hampshire Colleges
  32. New Jersey Colleges
  33. New Mexico Colleges
  34. New York Colleges
  35. North Carolina Colleges
  36. North Dakota Colleges
  37. Ohio Colleges
  38. Oklahoma Colleges
  39. Oregon Colleges
  40. Pennsylvania Colleges
  41. Puerto Rico Colleges
  42. Rhode Island Colleges
  43. South Carolina Colleges
  44. South Dakota Colleges
  45. Tennessee Colleges
  46. Texas Colleges
  47. Utah Colleges
  48. Vermont Colleges
  49. Virginia Colleges
  50. Washington Colleges
  51. West Virginia Colleges
  52. Wisconsin Colleges
  53. Wyoming Colleges
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Associate degrees can also provide worthwhile career training for a rising number of careers. A vocational training school provides both hands-on and general academic training to give you a well-rounded education and the skills you need to enter your desired career.

Schools offering associate’s degree – career training by state:

  1. Alabama Colleges
  2. Alaska Colleges
  3. American Samoa Colleges
  4. Arizona Colleges
  5. Arkansas Colleges
  6. California Colleges
  7. Colorado Colleges
  8. Connecticut Colleges
  9. Delaware Colleges
  10. District of Columbia Colleges
  11. Florida Colleges
  12. Georgia Colleges
  13. Hawaii Colleges
  14. Idaho Colleges
  15. Illinois Colleges
  16. Indiana Colleges
  17. Iowa Colleges
  18. Kansas Colleges
  19. Kentucky Colleges
  20. Louisiana Colleges
  21. Maine Colleges
  22. Maryland Colleges
  23. Massachusetts Colleges
  24. Michigan Colleges
  25. Minnesota Colleges
  26. Mississippi Colleges
  27. Missouri Colleges
  28. Montana Colleges
  29. Nebraska Colleges
  30. Nevada Colleges
  31. New Hampshire Colleges
  32. New Jersey Colleges
  33. New Mexico Colleges
  34. New York Colleges
  35. North Carolina Colleges
  36. North Dakota Colleges
  37. Ohio Colleges
  38. Oklahoma Colleges
  39. Oregon Colleges
  40. Pennsylvania Colleges
  41. Puerto Rico Colleges
  42. Rhode Island Colleges
  43. South Carolina Colleges
  44. South Dakota Colleges
  45. Tennessee Colleges
  46. Texas Colleges
  47. Utah Colleges
  48. Vermont Colleges
  49. Virgin Islands Colleges
  50. Virginia Colleges
  51. Washington Colleges
  52. West Virginia Colleges
  53. Wisconsin Colleges
  54. Wyoming Colleges

Final thoughts

So, is an associate degree worth it?

The FAQs above suggest the answer is “yes!”

If you’re looking for a chance to increase your career opportunities and gain potential without investing too much time and money, this could be the perfect balance for you!

Now that you know the value of earning an associate degree, you may have some doubts as to whether you really have what it takes. Let us bust your greatest excuse for putting off a degree in our article: The Best 11 Community Colleges in US by Cost and Quality.

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